A visit with loved friends. Canal latéral à la Marne. Photo by Amber Maitrejean

A visit with loved friends. Canal latéral à la Marne. Photo by Amber Maitrejean

Barbara :-D asked if I had a photo of the boat we call home. Looking through my archive I realized I have lots of pics of other boats and pics from the boat but none of the boat itself lol- this is El Milagro, my watery home, home on the Marne in the port of Neuilly-sur-Marne. It’s a 50’ 1969 all wood English coast guard boat. We have sailed over a 1000 miles in it from Pauillac in the south of France, up the canals and rivers: Garonne, Rhône, Saône, Marne and Seine. And boyyyy…do I have stories…. ;-)
Photos by Christophe Maitrejean
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Barbara :-D asked if I had a photo of the boat we call home. Looking through my archive I realized I have lots of pics of other boats and pics from the boat but none of the boat itself lol- this is El Milagro, my watery home, home on the Marne in the port of Neuilly-sur-Marne. It’s a 50’ 1969 all wood English coast guard boat. We have sailed over a 1000 miles in it from Pauillac in the south of France, up the canals and rivers: Garonne, Rhône, Saône, Marne and Seine. And boyyyy…do I have stories…. ;-)
Photos by Christophe Maitrejean
Zoom Info

Barbara :-D asked if I had a photo of the boat we call home. Looking through my archive I realized I have lots of pics of other boats and pics from the boat but none of the boat itself lol- this is El Milagro, my watery home, home on the Marne in the port of Neuilly-sur-Marne. It’s a 50’ 1969 all wood English coast guard boat. We have sailed over a 1000 miles in it from Pauillac in the south of France, up the canals and rivers: Garonne, Rhône, Saône, Marne and Seine. And boyyyy…do I have stories…. ;-)

Photos by Christophe Maitrejean

photoencounters:

…dreaming of a white Christmas. Dream series. Photo by Amber Maitrejean

Soooooo, it’s 94F right now…the high is forecast at 99F…and A/C is nothing but a memory…the plage is loaded with people…and I’m dreaming of the port on a day like this, covered in snow…that gentle *hush* sound of falling flakes of cold frosty goodness…little clouds of warm breath in cold air…the crunch of snow underfoot…the crisp clean air…bundled up in woolie mittens and scarves…  *she typed as sweat rolled down her face*,  which so interrupted the dream…

photoencounters:

…dreaming of a white Christmas. Dream series. Photo by Amber Maitrejean

Soooooo, it’s 94F right now…the high is forecast at 99F…and A/C is nothing but a memory…the plage is loaded with people…and I’m dreaming of the port on a day like this, covered in snow…that gentle *hush* sound of falling flakes of cold frosty goodness…little clouds of warm breath in cold air…the crunch of snow underfootthe crisp clean air…bundled up in woolie mittens and scarves…  *she typed as sweat rolled down her face*,  which so interrupted the dream…

The grave of Hubertine Auclert. Cimetière du Père-Lachaise. Paris. Photo by Amber Maitrejean
I was really excited to see the grave of Hubertine Auclert, a French feminist and suffragette! I have much to say about women/girls and the fact that of all people in the world no group is more discriminated against and abused than half of the world’s population- the female gender. But that’s for another day and another blog.
per wiki:

Hubertine Auclert (April 10, 1848 – August 4, 1914) was a militant anticlerical. While the main focus of the French feminist movement was directed towards changes to the laws, Auclert pushed further, demanding that women be given the right to run for public office, claiming that the unfair laws would never have been passed had the views of female legislators been heard. In 1876 she founded the Société le droit des femmes (The Rights of Women) that supported women’s suffrage and in 1883, the organization formally changed its name to the Société le suffrage des femmes (Women’s Suffrage Society). Beginning in 1880, Auclert launched a tax revolt, arguing that without representation women should not be subjected to taxation. In 1884, the French government finally legalized divorce but Auclert denounced it because of the law’s blatant bias against women that still did not allow a woman to keep her wages. Auclert proposed the then radical idea that there should be a marriage contract between spouses with separation of property.
In 1908 married women in France were finally given control over their own salaries but the 60-year-old Auclert continued her push for total equality. That year, she symbolically smashed a ballot box during municipal elections in Paris and in 1910 she and Marguerite Durand defied authorities and presented themselves as candidates in the elections for members of the legislative assembly.
Considered one of the central figures in the history of the French women’s rights movement, Hubertine Auclert continued her activism until her death in 1914 at age 65.


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The grave of Hubertine Auclert. Cimetière du Père-Lachaise. Paris. Photo by Amber Maitrejean
I was really excited to see the grave of Hubertine Auclert, a French feminist and suffragette! I have much to say about women/girls and the fact that of all people in the world no group is more discriminated against and abused than half of the world’s population- the female gender. But that’s for another day and another blog.
per wiki:

Hubertine Auclert (April 10, 1848 – August 4, 1914) was a militant anticlerical. While the main focus of the French feminist movement was directed towards changes to the laws, Auclert pushed further, demanding that women be given the right to run for public office, claiming that the unfair laws would never have been passed had the views of female legislators been heard. In 1876 she founded the Société le droit des femmes (The Rights of Women) that supported women’s suffrage and in 1883, the organization formally changed its name to the Société le suffrage des femmes (Women’s Suffrage Society). Beginning in 1880, Auclert launched a tax revolt, arguing that without representation women should not be subjected to taxation. In 1884, the French government finally legalized divorce but Auclert denounced it because of the law’s blatant bias against women that still did not allow a woman to keep her wages. Auclert proposed the then radical idea that there should be a marriage contract between spouses with separation of property.
In 1908 married women in France were finally given control over their own salaries but the 60-year-old Auclert continued her push for total equality. That year, she symbolically smashed a ballot box during municipal elections in Paris and in 1910 she and Marguerite Durand defied authorities and presented themselves as candidates in the elections for members of the legislative assembly.
Considered one of the central figures in the history of the French women’s rights movement, Hubertine Auclert continued her activism until her death in 1914 at age 65.


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The grave of Hubertine Auclert. Cimetière du Père-Lachaise. Paris. Photo by Amber Maitrejean
I was really excited to see the grave of Hubertine Auclert, a French feminist and suffragette! I have much to say about women/girls and the fact that of all people in the world no group is more discriminated against and abused than half of the world’s population- the female gender. But that’s for another day and another blog.
per wiki:

Hubertine Auclert (April 10, 1848 – August 4, 1914) was a militant anticlerical. While the main focus of the French feminist movement was directed towards changes to the laws, Auclert pushed further, demanding that women be given the right to run for public office, claiming that the unfair laws would never have been passed had the views of female legislators been heard. In 1876 she founded the Société le droit des femmes (The Rights of Women) that supported women’s suffrage and in 1883, the organization formally changed its name to the Société le suffrage des femmes (Women’s Suffrage Society). Beginning in 1880, Auclert launched a tax revolt, arguing that without representation women should not be subjected to taxation. In 1884, the French government finally legalized divorce but Auclert denounced it because of the law’s blatant bias against women that still did not allow a woman to keep her wages. Auclert proposed the then radical idea that there should be a marriage contract between spouses with separation of property.
In 1908 married women in France were finally given control over their own salaries but the 60-year-old Auclert continued her push for total equality. That year, she symbolically smashed a ballot box during municipal elections in Paris and in 1910 she and Marguerite Durand defied authorities and presented themselves as candidates in the elections for members of the legislative assembly.
Considered one of the central figures in the history of the French women’s rights movement, Hubertine Auclert continued her activism until her death in 1914 at age 65.


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The grave of Hubertine Auclert. Cimetière du Père-Lachaise. Paris. Photo by Amber Maitrejean

I was really excited to see the grave of Hubertine Auclert, a French feminist and suffragette! I have much to say about women/girls and the fact that of all people in the world no group is more discriminated against and abused than half of the world’s population- the female gender. But that’s for another day and another blog.

per wiki:

Hubertine Auclert (April 10, 1848 – August 4, 1914) was a militant anticlerical. While the main focus of the French feminist movement was directed towards changes to the laws, Auclert pushed further, demanding that women be given the right to run for public office, claiming that the unfair laws would never have been passed had the views of female legislators been heard. In 1876 she founded the Société le droit des femmes (The Rights of Women) that supported women’s suffrage and in 1883, the organization formally changed its name to the Société le suffrage des femmes (Women’s Suffrage Society). Beginning in 1880, Auclert launched a tax revolt, arguing that without representation women should not be subjected to taxation. In 1884, the French government finally legalized divorce but Auclert denounced it because of the law’s blatant bias against women that still did not allow a woman to keep her wages. Auclert proposed the then radical idea that there should be a marriage contract between spouses with separation of property.

In 1908 married women in France were finally given control over their own salaries but the 60-year-old Auclert continued her push for total equality. That year, she symbolically smashed a ballot box during municipal elections in Paris and in 1910 she and Marguerite Durand defied authorities and presented themselves as candidates in the elections for members of the legislative assembly.

Considered one of the central figures in the history of the French women’s rights movement, Hubertine Auclert continued her activism until her death in 1914 at age 65.

youneenknoit asked:

Why are the cemeteries in Paris so grand? It’s so scary.

History, my dear, history. :-)

I’ll keep this short, but truly, I could ramble on and on as I LOVE Pere Lachaise. :-))

When Père Lachaise opened in 1804 it was very far from Paris, as were the 2 other cemeteries of the time. Cimetière des Innocents, within the city limits of Paris, had become bloated with the dead forcing the location of new cemeteries outside of the city (and also why 6 million remains were moved to the ossuary under the city). Père Lachaise was not very popular until the bodies of La Fontaine and Molière were relocated there the same year. See image:

image

Then later in 1817, Joséphine Bonaparte, enamored by the great and tragic love story of Abélard and Héloïse, had their remains relocated to Père Lachaise. This made the cemetery a very desirable place to be buried for the famous and not so famous. Père Lachaise was planned as a garden cemetery, the first of its kind. Then the fashion turned to grand tombs for those who could afford the luxury and voilà- it grew to 110 acres with an estimated 1 million buried there in addition to another 2 million in the columbarium….and we get to be the recipients of this rich and lovely history. :-)

Thank you for the question. :-)) Cheers!