Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen. France Photo by Amber Maitrejean
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Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen. France Photo by Amber Maitrejean

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen. France Photo by Amber Maitrejean
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Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen. France Photo by Amber Maitrejean

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen. France. Photo by Amber Maitrejean
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Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen. France. Photo by Amber Maitrejean

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen. France. Photo by Amber Maitrejean
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Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen. France. Photo by Amber Maitrejean

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen. France. Photo by Amber Maitrejean
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Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Rouen. France. Photo by Amber Maitrejean

Thank you for the reblogs; Lensblr, Biutiful Pics and Inspiring Bits and Pieces. Happy, happy :-)
Thanks to tumblr peeps for the hearts and reblogs and thanks to the following peeps for their super comments: :-) Steve, Juan, Paul, Jane, Lina, Kristie, Angela, Alma, Andy, Ted, Constantine and Harry. Thank you for the smiles :-)
xo
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Thank you for the reblogs; Lensblr, Biutiful Pics and Inspiring Bits and Pieces. Happy, happy :-)

Thanks to tumblr peeps for the hearts and reblogs and thanks to the following peeps for their super comments: :-) Steve, Juan, Paul, Jane, Lina, Kristie, Angela, Alma, Andy, Ted, Constantine and Harry. Thank you for the smiles :-)

xo

Place de la Pucelle-d’Orleans. Rouen, France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

Hotel Bourgtherould, 16th century, Rouen, France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean


Originally a mansion for the Le Roux family, the building has seen many changes throughout the centuries. The mansion still retains many Gothic elements, however some of these were destroyed in 1944. In photo #2 we see the salamander, the emblem of Francios 1er.

Normandy, France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

Rouen, France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

The Church of St. Joan of Arc, Place du Vieux Marché, Rouen, France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

The church was completed in 1979 in the center of the Vieux Marché, at the place where St. Joan of Arc was martyred by burning at the stake on May 30, 1431. The building also serves as a national monument in her honor. The stained glass windows come from the 16th century Church of Saint Vincent that was destroyed during WWII in 1944, but the windows had been removed during the war to keep them safe.

The Church of St. Joan of Arc. Rouen, France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

A crucifix atop a stake and a small garden mark the location where Joan of Arc was martyred, burned alive at the stake, on May 30, 1431.

Saint Jeanne d’Arc, Saint Quiriace Collegiate Church, Provins, France Joan of Arc, Place des Pyramides, Paris, France Notre Dame Cathedral, the silhouette of a statue of Joan of Arc. Paris, France Jeanne d’Arc by Émile Chatrousse, 1887. Boulevard Saint-Marcel, Paris, France. Joan of Arc, Church of Jeanne d'Arc, Rouen, France Joan of Arc, Church of Jeanne d'Arc, Rouen, France

Jeanne d’Arc. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

“When we take your person into account, you who are a young maiden, to whom God gives the strength and power to be the champion who casts the rebels down and feeds France with the sweet, nourishing milk of peace, here indeed is something quite extraordinary!

For if God performed such a great number of miracles through Joshua who conquered many a place and cast down many an enemy, he, Joshua, was a strong and powerful man. But, after all, a woman – a simple shepherdess – braver than any man ever was in Rome! As far as God is concerned, this was easily accomplished.

But as for us, we never heard tell of such an extraordinary marvel, for the prowess of all the great men of the past cannot be compared to this woman’s whose concern it is to cast out our enemies. This is God’s doing: it is He who guides her and who has given her a heart greater than that of any man.”

~Christine de Pizan (1362-1433), Ditié de Jehanne d’Arc

Place du Vieux Marche and St. Joan of Arc Church. Rouen, France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

O Joan, without sepulchre, without portrait, you who knew the tomb of heroes is the heart of the living" ~Andre Malraux

1. Place du Vieux Marche, the scene of the martyrdom of Jeanne d’Arc on May 30, 1431.

The Church of St. Joan of Arc, completed in 1979, was built in the center of the square where the saint was burned at the stake. The church replaces the church of St. Vincent which was destroyed in WWII and also serves as a national monument to honor St. Joan. The architect, Louis Arretche, designed the roof of the church to resemble the flames which consumed the saint. The design is sweeping and dramatic, inspiring and moving.