Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
Statues include, the Apollo of Belvedere (bottom photo) and Dianna of Versailles (3rd photo). The fountain sculpture represents the nymph Scylla being transformed into a monster.
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 Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
Statues include, the Apollo of Belvedere (bottom photo) and Dianna of Versailles (3rd photo). The fountain sculpture represents the nymph Scylla being transformed into a monster.
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 Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
Statues include, the Apollo of Belvedere (bottom photo) and Dianna of Versailles (3rd photo). The fountain sculpture represents the nymph Scylla being transformed into a monster.
Zoom Info
 Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
Statues include, the Apollo of Belvedere (bottom photo) and Dianna of Versailles (3rd photo). The fountain sculpture represents the nymph Scylla being transformed into a monster.
Zoom Info
 Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
Statues include, the Apollo of Belvedere (bottom photo) and Dianna of Versailles (3rd photo). The fountain sculpture represents the nymph Scylla being transformed into a monster.
Zoom Info

Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

Statues include, the Apollo of Belvedere (bottom photo) and Dianna of Versailles (3rd photo). The fountain sculpture represents the nymph Scylla being transformed into a monster.

Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
The Children’s Dining Room- was originally used as a bathroom in the 18th century. The Marquis de Pompadour commissioned the decor from the architect Gabriel. Louis Mansiaux created the faux marble stucco, the only surviving example of this type of decor from the 18th century.
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Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
The Children’s Dining Room- was originally used as a bathroom in the 18th century. The Marquis de Pompadour commissioned the decor from the architect Gabriel. Louis Mansiaux created the faux marble stucco, the only surviving example of this type of decor from the 18th century.
Zoom Info

Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

The Children’s Dining Room- was originally used as a bathroom in the 18th century. The Marquis de Pompadour commissioned the decor from the architect Gabriel. Louis Mansiaux created the faux marble stucco, the only surviving example of this type of decor from the 18th century.

Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
1st photo- The Smoking Room.
2nd, 3rd and 4th photos- The Red Salon- This room was originally a bedchamber which Cahen d’Anvers converted to an office around 1928. The walls are covered in red silks replicated from the original silks selected by Cahen d’Anvers’ mother.
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Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
1st photo- The Smoking Room.
2nd, 3rd and 4th photos- The Red Salon- This room was originally a bedchamber which Cahen d’Anvers converted to an office around 1928. The walls are covered in red silks replicated from the original silks selected by Cahen d’Anvers’ mother.
Zoom Info
Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
1st photo- The Smoking Room.
2nd, 3rd and 4th photos- The Red Salon- This room was originally a bedchamber which Cahen d’Anvers converted to an office around 1928. The walls are covered in red silks replicated from the original silks selected by Cahen d’Anvers’ mother.
Zoom Info
Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
1st photo- The Smoking Room.
2nd, 3rd and 4th photos- The Red Salon- This room was originally a bedchamber which Cahen d’Anvers converted to an office around 1928. The walls are covered in red silks replicated from the original silks selected by Cahen d’Anvers’ mother.
Zoom Info

Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

1st photo- The Smoking Room.

2nd, 3rd and 4th photos- The Red Salon- This room was originally a bedchamber which Cahen d’Anvers converted to an office around 1928. The walls are covered in red silks replicated from the original silks selected by Cahen d’Anvers’ mother.

Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
The CamaÏeu Cabinet- was originally a dressing room. The wood paneling dates from 1707 and was painted in a Chinese motif in shades of blue by Huet in 1748.
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Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
The CamaÏeu Cabinet- was originally a dressing room. The wood paneling dates from 1707 and was painted in a Chinese motif in shades of blue by Huet in 1748.
Zoom Info

Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

The CamaÏeu Cabinet- was originally a dressing room. The wood paneling dates from 1707 and was painted in a Chinese motif in shades of blue by Huet in 1748.

The Chinese Salon. Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
This was a major reception room. The painted woodwork depicts scenes from the far east. The Cahen d’Anvers family introduced a set of Louis XV chairs to coordinate with the decorated panels. The tapestry of the chairs illustrates the fables of La Fontaine.
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The Chinese Salon. Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
This was a major reception room. The painted woodwork depicts scenes from the far east. The Cahen d’Anvers family introduced a set of Louis XV chairs to coordinate with the decorated panels. The tapestry of the chairs illustrates the fables of La Fontaine.
Zoom Info
The Chinese Salon. Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
This was a major reception room. The painted woodwork depicts scenes from the far east. The Cahen d’Anvers family introduced a set of Louis XV chairs to coordinate with the decorated panels. The tapestry of the chairs illustrates the fables of La Fontaine.
Zoom Info
The Chinese Salon. Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
This was a major reception room. The painted woodwork depicts scenes from the far east. The Cahen d’Anvers family introduced a set of Louis XV chairs to coordinate with the decorated panels. The tapestry of the chairs illustrates the fables of La Fontaine.
Zoom Info
The Chinese Salon. Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
This was a major reception room. The painted woodwork depicts scenes from the far east. The Cahen d’Anvers family introduced a set of Louis XV chairs to coordinate with the decorated panels. The tapestry of the chairs illustrates the fables of La Fontaine.
Zoom Info

The Chinese Salon. Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

This was a major reception room. The painted woodwork depicts scenes from the far east. The Cahen d’Anvers family introduced a set of Louis XV chairs to coordinate with the decorated panels. The tapestry of the chairs illustrates the fables of La Fontaine.

Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
Let’s go inside for a visit! :-)
The chateau was built between 1703 - 1707, by the architect Jean-Baptiste Bullet de Chamblain for Paul Poisson de Bourvallais, a wealthy financier. After the arrest of the owner, the chateau was sold in 1718 to the Princess de Conti who then gave it to her cousin the Duke de la Vallière. His son, Louis César undertook the major decoration of the chateau. César rented the estate to his friend the Marquise de Pompadour from 1757 -1759. During the Revolution the estate was seized and the furnishings sold. The property then passed through various hands before the banker Louis Cahen d’Anvers acquired it in 1895. He then had the chateau restored by the architect Walter André Destailleur. He purchased the furniture and completed the 18th century decor. Charles Cahen d’Anvers, son of Louis, donated the property to the state in 1935, and sold the furnishings to it. From 1939 to 1974, the chateau was used to receive foreign Heads of State, after which the estate was opened to the public. For 6 years the estate underwent extensive renovations to return it the condition it enjoyed under Cahen d’Anvers.
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Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
Let’s go inside for a visit! :-)
The chateau was built between 1703 - 1707, by the architect Jean-Baptiste Bullet de Chamblain for Paul Poisson de Bourvallais, a wealthy financier. After the arrest of the owner, the chateau was sold in 1718 to the Princess de Conti who then gave it to her cousin the Duke de la Vallière. His son, Louis César undertook the major decoration of the chateau. César rented the estate to his friend the Marquise de Pompadour from 1757 -1759. During the Revolution the estate was seized and the furnishings sold. The property then passed through various hands before the banker Louis Cahen d’Anvers acquired it in 1895. He then had the chateau restored by the architect Walter André Destailleur. He purchased the furniture and completed the 18th century decor. Charles Cahen d’Anvers, son of Louis, donated the property to the state in 1935, and sold the furnishings to it. From 1939 to 1974, the chateau was used to receive foreign Heads of State, after which the estate was opened to the public. For 6 years the estate underwent extensive renovations to return it the condition it enjoyed under Cahen d’Anvers.
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Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
Let’s go inside for a visit! :-)
The chateau was built between 1703 - 1707, by the architect Jean-Baptiste Bullet de Chamblain for Paul Poisson de Bourvallais, a wealthy financier. After the arrest of the owner, the chateau was sold in 1718 to the Princess de Conti who then gave it to her cousin the Duke de la Vallière. His son, Louis César undertook the major decoration of the chateau. César rented the estate to his friend the Marquise de Pompadour from 1757 -1759. During the Revolution the estate was seized and the furnishings sold. The property then passed through various hands before the banker Louis Cahen d’Anvers acquired it in 1895. He then had the chateau restored by the architect Walter André Destailleur. He purchased the furniture and completed the 18th century decor. Charles Cahen d’Anvers, son of Louis, donated the property to the state in 1935, and sold the furnishings to it. From 1939 to 1974, the chateau was used to receive foreign Heads of State, after which the estate was opened to the public. For 6 years the estate underwent extensive renovations to return it the condition it enjoyed under Cahen d’Anvers.
Zoom Info
Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
Let’s go inside for a visit! :-)
The chateau was built between 1703 - 1707, by the architect Jean-Baptiste Bullet de Chamblain for Paul Poisson de Bourvallais, a wealthy financier. After the arrest of the owner, the chateau was sold in 1718 to the Princess de Conti who then gave it to her cousin the Duke de la Vallière. His son, Louis César undertook the major decoration of the chateau. César rented the estate to his friend the Marquise de Pompadour from 1757 -1759. During the Revolution the estate was seized and the furnishings sold. The property then passed through various hands before the banker Louis Cahen d’Anvers acquired it in 1895. He then had the chateau restored by the architect Walter André Destailleur. He purchased the furniture and completed the 18th century decor. Charles Cahen d’Anvers, son of Louis, donated the property to the state in 1935, and sold the furnishings to it. From 1939 to 1974, the chateau was used to receive foreign Heads of State, after which the estate was opened to the public. For 6 years the estate underwent extensive renovations to return it the condition it enjoyed under Cahen d’Anvers.
Zoom Info

Chateau Champs-sur-Marne. France. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

Let’s go inside for a visit! :-)

The chateau was built between 1703 - 1707, by the architect Jean-Baptiste Bullet de Chamblain for Paul Poisson de Bourvallais, a wealthy financier. After the arrest of the owner, the chateau was sold in 1718 to the Princess de Conti who then gave it to her cousin the Duke de la Vallière. His son, Louis César undertook the major decoration of the chateau. César rented the estate to his friend the Marquise de Pompadour from 1757 -1759. During the Revolution the estate was seized and the furnishings sold. The property then passed through various hands before the banker Louis Cahen d’Anvers acquired it in 1895. He then had the chateau restored by the architect Walter André Destailleur. He purchased the furniture and completed the 18th century decor. Charles Cahen d’Anvers, son of Louis, donated the property to the state in 1935, and sold the furnishings to it. From 1939 to 1974, the chateau was used to receive foreign Heads of State, after which the estate was opened to the public. For 6 years the estate underwent extensive renovations to return it the condition it enjoyed under Cahen d’Anvers.

The medieval castle, Chateau de Tarascon on the River Rhone, France. Photo by Amber Maitrejean
Virtual art series.

The medieval castle, Chateau de Tarascon on the River Rhone, France. Photo by Amber Maitrejean

Virtual art series.

Chateau Chantilly. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
A serendipitous moment that I wanted to share even though the photos are blurry. We were driving home this evening following a route that tomtom mapped out when suddenly we were bumping over a cobblestone road and there standing against the darkening sky was this castle! We stopped so I could take a few photos although I knew my camera battery was blinking the red light of death. I had just enough power to take these shots and then it died. I will be back and I will take better quality photos next time lol. But for whatever reason, a serendipitous moment I was meant to experience. I’ll take it :-)
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Chateau Chantilly. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
A serendipitous moment that I wanted to share even though the photos are blurry. We were driving home this evening following a route that tomtom mapped out when suddenly we were bumping over a cobblestone road and there standing against the darkening sky was this castle! We stopped so I could take a few photos although I knew my camera battery was blinking the red light of death. I had just enough power to take these shots and then it died. I will be back and I will take better quality photos next time lol. But for whatever reason, a serendipitous moment I was meant to experience. I’ll take it :-)
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Chateau Chantilly. Photos by Amber Maitrejean
A serendipitous moment that I wanted to share even though the photos are blurry. We were driving home this evening following a route that tomtom mapped out when suddenly we were bumping over a cobblestone road and there standing against the darkening sky was this castle! We stopped so I could take a few photos although I knew my camera battery was blinking the red light of death. I had just enough power to take these shots and then it died. I will be back and I will take better quality photos next time lol. But for whatever reason, a serendipitous moment I was meant to experience. I’ll take it :-)
Zoom Info

Chateau Chantilly. Photos by Amber Maitrejean

A serendipitous moment that I wanted to share even though the photos are blurry. We were driving home this evening following a route that tomtom mapped out when suddenly we were bumping over a cobblestone road and there standing against the darkening sky was this castle! We stopped so I could take a few photos although I knew my camera battery was blinking the red light of death. I had just enough power to take these shots and then it died. I will be back and I will take better quality photos next time lol. But for whatever reason, a serendipitous moment I was meant to experience. I’ll take it :-)